My Name Is

It turns out that whenever I interact with people who aren’t familiar with the Polish language, they have a hard time repeating my name. That’s why I started using its English version on social media.

If you were ever curious, this is how I pronounce my actual name Grzegorz:

Pronunciation of my name

There is also a notational standard IPA for the phonemic and phonetic representation of all spoken languages, which encodes pronunciation as:

/ˈɡʐɛ.ɡɔʂ/

https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Grzegorz

How to Start Block Development with Scaffolding

Can you believe that it’s been two years already since the Gutenberg editor was introduced in WordPress Core? In the meantime, the block editor has matured tremendously. As of today, it also offers several no-code options for consuming custom blocks. In my opinion, the most appealing features to explore are Block Directory and block patterns. In addition to that, it was always possible to create a reusable block to share content between posts.

However, in this tutorial, I want to focus on the situation when you decide that the options I mentioned don’t fit your use case. You want to build a custom block. I’m about to present how scaffolding speeds up WordPress block development and makes the whole process way more approachable.

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WPBlockTalk April 2020

A first WPBlockTalk live event happened two weeks ago, and it was a blast! You could see speakers from all across the WordPress community, from theme designers to plugin developers to the people who’ve been key to designing and developing the block editor itself. I played my role in it, and you can already watch two talks where I appeared.

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Adding Formatting Buttons to the Block Toolbar in Gutenberg

In April last year, I had a lot of fun doing a live coding session for the WordPress Block Editor. The demo was hosted by Birgit Pauli-Haack as part of the Gutenberg Times, Live Q & A series. I paired with Zac Gordon, an educator at JavaScript for WordPress with a ton of Javascript online courses for WordPress developers. This is what we covered:

We explored how to customize format controls like bold or italics and extend the block toolbar with your control allowing to change the color of the selected text.

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JavaScript for WordPress Conference 2019

In my presentation from the 2019 JavaScript for WordPress Conference, I talked about how you can grow your JavaScript and related skills through building with WordPress. You can watch the recorded video on YouTube.

There is also a written version of the same talk published on my blog a few months back. If you prefer reading, check out Growing JavaScript Skills with WordPress post.

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Growing JavaScript Skills with WordPress

This is a written version of the talk I gave at the JavaScript for WordPress conference on July 12th.

WordPress has always been recognized as a very welcoming platform for developers at any level of expertise. The block editor introduced in WordPress 5.0 release is not only an entirely new editing experience for users, but it also redefines the way plugins and themes are developed.

In this post, I want to explain many of the architectural decisions that have sought to make the transition as smooth as possible for those familiar with WordPress development. I will discuss all the tooling that the Gutenberg project uses behind the scenes to benefit from the massive growth of the JavaScript ecosystem. Finally, I’d like to demonstrate how you can leverage the same software in your projects using the @wordpress/scripts npm package to improve your skills.

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Starter kit and reusable scripts

The JavaScript ecosystem has reached a very interesting point in its history. There are members of the community overwhelmed by the learning curve required to start a new project and based on that they express JavaScript fatigue. There are also contradicting opinions announcing renaissance of JavaScript because it became truly general purpose language and dominated front-end development. So the question is, how to take advantage of all existing tools but at the same time change the first impression in a way that makes the following joke irrelevant:

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Migrating to Jest test runner

I have already shared my comparison of two JavaScript testing solutions where I admitted that I favor Jest over Mocha. Back then, I listed all major differences between those tools summarized with advantages and disadvantages of migrating to Jest:

Pros:

  • Simpler API, less boilerplate code.
  • Flexible and easy configuration.
  • Test files executed in isolation.
  • Advanced watch mode.
  • Snapshots support = easier start with testing.
  • Code coverage.

Cons:

  • Another migration.
  • Mocha has still a bit better performance (according to my quick tests).

My analysis got very positive feedback, with only a few little concerns, so I got encouraged to take action and verify the assumptions stated. I picked two different projects to play with to ensure both of them will uniformly benefit from using Jest.

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React Native EU 2017 – my selective recap

I had an opportunity to attended React Native EU 2017 conference last month. This 2 days long event took place in my hometown Wrocław, Poland. It was a very interesting experience for me because I’m a frontend developer. I don’t have any working experience with React Native and the only mobile project I worked on was built using Apache Cordova. Anyway, I found many of the talks very attractive and I wanted to highlight some of them in this post.

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Central Japan with Shinkansen

Visiting Japan is definitely a unique experience. With my wife, we went there directly from the trip to Sri Lanka in July 2016. We have been travelling between numerous cities for 10 days. First we rode between Tokyo and Kobe by the famous bullet train Shinkansen. Then we spent one night in an historical Ryokan with hot springs in the Arima Onsen area located behind the Mount Rokko. We also visited two old capital cities Kyoto and Nara. Finally we had a chance to see Mount Fuji hidden behind the clouds from a Shinkansen car’s side window on our way back to Tokyo.

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